Nashville Academy of Medicine Historical Timeline

The Nashville Academy of Medicine's historical timeline represents the academy's founding by seven physicians in 1821 through the celebration of our 200th anniversary in 2021.

"No city in the United States has a more fascinating medical history. Practically from its beginnings, Nashville has been a fertile ground of American medical education, practice, and research. An essential part of this story are the physicians, hospitals, and laboratories who have contributed to Nashville's life and times." ~ Nashville Medicine, A History, by James Summerville

Each image and article is clickable and will open in a separate window for clearer viewing of the content.

  • Mar 5, 1821

    1821

    The first medical association in Tennessee, was founded in Nashville on March 5, 1821, by seven physicians in the log courthouse on the Public Square. The president was Dr. Felix Robertson, who was twice elected mayor of Nashville. The first secretary was Dr. James Roane, and the other five included Drs. Boyd McNairy, A.G. Goodlett, James Overton, John Waters, and R.A. Higginbotham.

       
    L-R: Dr. Felix Robertson, Dr. James Roane, Dr. Adam Goodlett, Dr. Boyd McNairy, Dr. James Overton (not pictured, Dr. John Waters and Dr. R. A. Higginbotham)

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Felix Robertson - 1821 NAM President

    In 1806, our first NAM President, Dr. Felix Robertson, graduated from the University of Pennsylvania medical school under the direction of Dr. Benjamin Rush, the leading medical educator of the day. Dr. Robertson, age 25, returned to Nashville that year to open his practice of medicine. Two years later, in 1808, Dr. Robertson married Lydia Waters who was the sister of fellow future NAM founder and partner in medical practice, Dr. John Waters. Nashville was incorporated as a city that same year and made Davidson County the county seat. Dr. Robertson practiced medicine in Nashville for forty years and served as Mayor of Nashville from 1818-1819 as well as from 1827-1829. Dr. Robertson was also one of the founders of the Medical Society of Tennessee, now the Tennessee Medical Association. He served as president for four terms spanning 1834-1840 and 1853-1855. His portrait shown here was painted by Washington Bogart Cooper in July 1839 and is displayed in the Tennessee State Museum in Nashville.


    Felix Robertson, MD, 1781-1865

  • Apr 23, 2021

    1821

    October 24, 1821 Nashville Whig newspaper

    The newly formed Nashville Medical Society (now NAM) instituted agreed-upon fees for various medical services including:
    $1 for in-town visits
    $1 per mile for riding in the country
    $1 for extracting a tooth
    $1 for a half dozen pills
    $2 for cupping
    $5 for a visit at night
    $20 for obstetrical cases
    $50 for amputation of a thigh, leg, or arm

     

     

  • Apr 23, 2021

    1823

    As the framework for antebellum Nashville was taking shape, the city was often asking residents and business owners to underwrite basic public services. On this list was the need for a public hospital, supported by Drs. Boyd McNairy, James Overton, James Roane, and Felix Robertson. The hospital was called Hospital of the State of Tennessee, The Old Asylum, and benefitted people in poverty and those suffering with mental illness. 

    April 8, 1951, Tennessean article

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. James Roane - 1830 NAM President

    Dr. James Roane was simultaneously president of NAM and the Tennessee Medical Association, serving as TMA's first president from 1830 until his untimely death in 1833. Dr. Roane contracted cholera from the many patients he was tending during the epidemic. Dr. Roane was one of the founders of TMA, then called the Medical Society of Tennessee. 

     
    James Roane, MD, 1790 - 1833

  • Apr 27, 2021

    1830

    In 1830, the Medical Society of Tennessee was founded, which is now the Tennessee Medical Association​. Dr. James Roane from Nashville was the first president. 79 of the 151 charter members were from Middle Tennessee and three of the five officers were from Nashville.

    The book entitled Centennial History of the Tennessee State Medical Association states, “The election of officers was held with the result that James Roane of Nashville ‘whose suavity of manner and benignity of temper, conjoined with professional worth and general scholarship, made him a universal favorite’ was chosen president; James King of Knoxville was chosen vice-president; James M. Walker of Nashville, recording secretary; Lunsford P. Yandell of Rutherford County, corresponding secretary; and Boyd McNairy of Nashville, Treasurer.”

    This same book also states in summary of the first meeting, “After thanking the Medical Society of Nashville for the accommodations that it had afforded to the state society, the new-born Medical Society of Tennessee adjourned.” The Nashville Academy of Medicine would like to recognize the following charter members of the TMA from Davidson County:
    • Dr. Samuel Hogg
    • Dr. James Roane
    • Dr. Felix Robertson
    • Dr. R.A. Higginbotham
    • Dr. Boyd McNairy
    • Dr. James M. Walker
    • Dr. Charles Pugsley
    • Dr. John Waters
    • Dr. John Maxey
    • Dr. James Overton

    Charter members of the Medical Society of Tennessee, now TMA

  • Apr 27, 2021

    1832

    A committee consisting of Drs. Boyd McNairy, James Roane, Samuel Hogg, J. L. Hadley, Felix Robertson, and James Overton pushed for the city's first public health measures in response to a cholera epidemic. 

     

     

    August 29, 1832 Nashville Banner article about cholera outbreak

  • May 7, 2021

    1840-1842 - TMA President Dr. Samuel Hogg

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Charles K. Winston - 1844 NAM President

    Charles Kimbrough Winston moved to Nashville in 1842 with his wife Ann. On June 13, 1843, Nashville Union announced that Dr. Winston’s practice would be on Cherry Street (now 4th Avenue North), in the former office of Dr. Samuel Hogg who had died the previous year. In the newspaper announcement, Dr. Winston ventured to say “He could be consulted there by those friends who feel disposed to patronize him. Those in need of his services during the night, please call at the City Hotel, his residence.” Dr. Winston was a founder of the Medical School at the University of Nashville and its first president in 1850. He served for many years as professor of obstetrics in the Medical Department of the University of Nashville. Dr. Winston was president of the Tennessee Medical Association in 1859-1861. He also served as the Mayor of South Nashville, President of the Board of Education of Nashville, and President of the Board of Common Council. 


    Charles K. Winston, MD, 1811-1882

  • Apr 27, 2021

    1851

    In 1850 Dr. Charles K. Winston helped found the Medical Department at the University of Nashville and became its first president. Co-founders included Dr. William Briggs (American Medical Association President 1891) and Dr. A. H. Buchanan (Nashville Medical Society President 1858). Dr. Winston had previously been the president of the Nashville Medical Society in 1844 and was later president of the Tennessee Medical Society in 1859. He also served a term as mayor of South Nashville. The department never recovered from the interruptions of the war, and in 1874 entered into a partnership with Vanderbilt University. The partnership dissolved in 1895. 

    June 15, 1930 Nashville Tennessean article

  • May 7, 2021

    1851-1853 - TMA President Dr. John M. Watson

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. William K. Bowling - 1853 NAM President

    Dr. William K. Bowling became the second of eight Nashville physicians elected president of the American Medical Association in 1875. Dr. Bowling also founded the Nashville Journal of Medicine and Surgery which he sustained for a quarter of a century.


    William K. Bowling, MD, 1808-1885

  • Apr 22, 2021

    1857

    Dr. Paul F. Eve became the first of eight Nashville physicians elected President of the American Medical Association. Nashville has provided more presidents to the American Medical Association than any other city in the United States. Dr. Eve was also president of the Tennessee Medical Association in 1871-1872. He was the first professor of operative and clinical surgery at the newly opened Vanderbilt University and was noted as performing the first successful hysterectomy in the United States.

    Dr. Eve was the father of Dr. Duncan Eve, 1889-1890 TMA president, and the father of Dr. Paul Eve, Jr., 1904-1905 TMA president.

    Dr. Paul F. Eve, 1806-1877

  • Apr 22, 2021

    1857

    In May of 1857, the American Medical Association held its tenth annual meeting in Nashville, where Dr. Paul F. Eve was sworn in as President. The meeting was held at the State Capitol and was billed as a grand affair for all physicians in attendance. As the below article states, "a genuine Tennessee welcome will be extended to one and all."

    April 30, 1857 Republican Banner article

  • Apr 22, 2021

    1857

    Dr. John Shelby was likely one of the earliest members of NAM also, other than the founders, as he moved to Nashville in 1817 and set up a medical partnership with his neighbor, Dr. Boyd McNairy, one of the Nashville Medical Society's original founders. Born in 1786, Dr. Shelby was a physician, a Postmaster, and a civic and church leader. He served as Hospital Surgeon under Andrew Jackson in Col. Edward Bradley's regiment during the Creek War. He was wounded and lost an eye as a result. After the war he returned to practice medicine in Sumner County and served as state Senator for Sumner County from 1815 to 1817. Dr. Shelby moved from Sumner County to Nashville in 1817, and he served as Postmaster of Nashville from 1849 to 1853.

    Dr. John Shelby played a role in the establishment of the short-lived Shelby Medical College in 1857, along with Dr. Thomas Maddin, Jr., (Nashville Medical Society President 1869) and two other local physicians. The location was at the present-day U.S. Customs House. The four envisioned Shelby Medical College as the cornerstone of a proposed Central University of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, which instead grew into Vanderbilt University. Shelby Medical College closed its doors around 1861 as enrollment declined and the building was needed for a Civil War hospital.

    Curriculum and Fees

         
    Excerpts from December 12, 1976, Tennessean article

  • May 7, 2021

    1857-1858 - TMA President Dr. John P. Ford

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. A. H. Buchanan - 1858 NAM President

  • Apr 22, 2021

    1859

    Dr. Charles K. Winston proposed that local physicians solicit the city government to formally establish a board of health and push for sanitation laws to combat the spread of infections. The start of the Civil War stalled this effort until 1866.

  • Apr 22, 2021

    1863

    A mass exodus of migrants fled Nashville after it was surrendered to the Union during the Civil War. Many doctors left as well, but seven pledged to “remain at all costs”: Drs. William Bowling, William T. Briggs, Thomas Maddin, Jr., J. Dudley Winston, Charles K. Winston, A. A. Hatcher, and S. L. Wharton. In 1865 the Nashville Medical Society convened after a brief hiatus, re-adopting its constitution and resolving that "no corporate or legal interruption" had occurred as a result of the war. The following year in 1866, Tennessee became the first state to be readmitted to the Union after the General Assembly ratified the 14th amendment.

    Nashville, circa 1865

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Thomas Menees - 1866 NAM President

    Dr. Thomas Menees earned his medical degree from Transylvania University in Kentucky in 1846. After serving in the Civil War, Dr. Menees located to Nashville and became an obstetrician. In 1874, after the merger of the medical departments at the University of Nashville and Vanderbilt University, Dr. Menees became the dean of both departments. 


    Thomas Menees, MD, 1812-1905

  • Apr 29, 2021

    1866

    The Nashville Medical Society, moved by Dr. Charles Winston's efforts in 1859, influenced the city of Nashville to create a city-wide board of health, largely due to a cholera outbreak. The society set up its own board, assigning two physicians per ward to oversee such concerns as hygiene, endemic diseases, and sanitation measures. This eventually impacted other public health concerns such as a comprehensive sewage system, a pure water supply, and clean streets. It wasn't until 1873 that a permanent Board of Health was established in the city of Nashville.

    1866 Nashville Daily Union article naming physicians to board of health wards

  • May 7, 2021

    1866-1867- TMA President Dr. Robert Martin

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. John Dudley Winston - 1867 NAM President

    Dr. John Dudley Winston was the president of the Tennessee Medical Association in 1868-1869.

    John Dudley Winston, MD, 1805-1873

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Thomas L. Maddin, Jr. - 1869 NAM President

    Dr. Thomas L. Maddin, Jr., was president of the Tennessee Medical Association in 1885-1886. Dr. Maddin was a professor in the medical school at the University of Nashville from 1867 until the merger with Vanderbilt in 1873, serving at Vanderbilt until 1895. When the medical school re-joined the University of Nashville, Dr. Maddin served as the chair of nervous diseases and general pathology.

    Dr. Maddin is the father of Dr. John Wesley Maddin, NAM president 1886.


    Thomas L. Maddin, Jr., 1826-1908

  • Apr 23, 2021

    1869

    Organized medicine in Nashville has often been a family affair. Since 1869 there have been nine sets of family members who served in presidential leadership roles at NAM, TMA, and/or the AMA.
    Dr. Thomas Lafayette Maddin, Jr. (father) - NAM president 1869, TMA president 1885 
    Dr. John Wesley Maddin (son) - NAM president 1886
    Dr. Paul F. Eve (father) - TMA president 1871, AMA president 1857
    Dr. Paul F. Eve, Jr. (son) - TMA president 1904
    Dr. Duncan Eve (son) - TMA president 1889

    Dr. Thomas A. Atchison (uncle) - NAM president 1887
    Dr. William A. Atchison (nephew) - NAM president 1888
    Dr. William D. Haggard (uncle) - NAM president 1892, TMA president 1913, AMA president 1925
    Dr. Henry L. Douglass (nephew) - NAM president 1943
    Dr. Lucius E. Burch (father) - NAM president 1906

    Dr. John C. Burch (son) - NAM president 1947
    Dr. Harrison H. Shoulders (brother) - NAM president 1927, AMA president 1946
    Dr. Heddy S. Shoulders (brother) - NAM president 1936
    Dr. W. G. Kennon, Sr. (father) - NAM president 1935
    Dr. William G. Kennon, Jr. (son) - NAM president 1958
    Dr. David R. Pickens (father) - NAM president 1923
    Dr. David R. Pickens, Jr. (son) - NAM president 1975
    Dr. Arthur G. Bond (brother) - NAM president 1992
    Dr. John B. Bond (brother) - NAM president 2002

  • May 7, 2021

    1870-1871- TMA President Dr. Joseph E. Manlove

  • Apr 23, 2021

    1872

    On December 15, 1872, a Nashville Union and American reporter interviewed physician Dr. T. L. Madden about reports of smallpox in Nashville. While he confirmed a few cases among one family, Dr. Madden indicated that other reports had not been substantiated and referred the reporter to the city's physician. The article ends with the phrase, "In this age of civilization, a man has as much reason to doubt the utility of the steam engine, as to doubt the efficacy of vaccination.”

    Nashville Union and American, December 15, 1872

     

  • Apr 23, 2021

    1873

    In 1873, after years of pressure from Nashville physicians, a formal Board of Health was established in the city of Nashville. It was several years until the state of Tennessee created a Board of Health. 

    Map of Nashville circa 1871

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Van S. Lindsley - 1874 NAM President



    Van S. Lindsley, MD, 1840-1885

  • Apr 23, 2021

    1874

    This building on the old south campus served the Medical School until 1925.
    Historical marker recognizing the founding of Vanderbilt University

    Vanderbilt University's School of Medicine had been part of the University of Nashville since it was founded in 1851. In 1874, the school was incorporated into Vanderbilt and was renamed the Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Vanderbilt formally cut ties with the University of Nashville in 1895, retaining most of the faculty, many of whom had leadership ties to the Nashville Medical Society. 

    Learn more about the history of the medical school here.

                     

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. J. S. Cain - 1875 NAM President

    Dr. J. S. Cain was president of the Middle Tennessee Medical Association in 1896. Dr. Cain eventually left Nashville to become dean of the department of medicine at the University of the South.

    In this Daily American article from January 23, 1889, Dr. Cain argues for regulation of the practice of medicine in Tennessee. 


    J. S. Cain, MD, 1829-1916

  • Apr 22, 2021

    1875

    In 1875 the Nashville Academy of Medicine admitted its first Jewish member. Dr. Gustavus Schiff was born in Lippe-Detmold, Germany, on August 20, 1833, and emigrated to the United States in 1857. He earned his medical degree before emigrating at Julio-Maximillian University in Wuerzburg, Bavaria in January, 1856. He practiced in New York, Chicago, and Memphis before settling in Nashville and practicing from 1859 to 1878. During that time he served as an Assistant Surgeon in the Civil War and heroically stood his post when many physicians left, serving nobly in caring for the sick and wounded. After the war, Dr. Schiff made it through the cholera epidemics of 1866 and 1873 with unwavering courage, doing his duty to care for suffering patients. He also completed his civic duty for the city of Nashville by serving in one of Nashville's 10 wards, appointed to handle concerns related to the health of city water, drainage, and sewage.

    Tennessean article from March 29, 1871

  • Apr 22, 2021

    1875

    In 1875, Dr. William K. Bowling became the second of eight presidents of the American Medical Association from Nashville. Dr. Bowling was a voracious reader, claiming to have read 500 volumes from his father's library by age 14. He studied medicine at the Medical College of Ohio and the Medical Department of the Cincinnati College, earning his degree in 1836. He moved to Nashville in 1850 and worked with Dr. Berrien Lindsley on establishing a medical college at the University of Nashville. While at the University of Nashville, Dr. Bowling taught over 3,000 students. In 1851 he founded the Nashville Journal of Medicine and Surgery and sustained it for 25 years. 


    William K. Bowling, MD, 1808-1885

  • Apr 27, 2021

    1876

    In 1876, Samuel Meharry and his four brothers (Alexander, David, Hugh, and Jesse) funded Central Tennessee College's medical department, now known as Meharry Medical College. The motive for the gift was an act of kindness by an unnamed black family who helped Samuel move his wagon of salt that became stuck in a muddy ditch. The family had recently been freed from slavery and risked their vulnerability to help Samuel at a time when slave hunters were paid to return slaves. Samuel was so moved by their actions he vowed, "I have no money now, but when I am able, I shall do something for your race."

    The Meharry brothers

  • Apr 27, 2021

    1877

    In the spring of 1877, Dr. William K. Bowling (Nashville Medical Society President 1853) along with prominent Nashville physicians such as Dr. Paul F. Eve and Dr. T. B. Buchanan, began teaching at the newly formed Nashville Medical College. In 1879, the University of Tennessee proposed adoption of the college into the institution. As morale fell and faculty began leaving, the medical college moved operations to Knoxville in 1911 and eventually to its present home in Memphis. 

    Daily American, July 24, 1877

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. James D. Plunket - 1877 NAM President

    Dr. James D. Plunkett’s offices were at 145 North Spruce Street, Nashville. Dr. Plunkett later served as the only physician from Tennessee on the committee on national health legislation for the American Public Health Association from 1895-1897. Dr. J. Berrien Lindsley from Nashville also served, representing Tennessee on the Advisory Council during this same year. Physicians from across the country and Mexico served on these committees to advance public health.


    James D. Plunket, MD, 1839-1923 

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. William C. Blackman - 1879 NAM President

    Dr. William Crutcher Blackman graduated from the University of Pennsylvania Medical School on April 3, 1847, and married Susan L. Clark on June 13, 1850, in Nashville, Tennessee. He became president of the Nashville Medical Society in 1879. 

    William Crutcher Blackman, MD, 1827-1905

  • May 7, 2021

    1879

    The map below was published by the Nashville Board of Health to go with its 1879 report. The Tennessee Virtal Archive states, "This map details streets names, toll gates, colleges, railways, and sites such as the Capitol, a cotton factory(on the future site of Werthan Bag Co.) and cemeteries. It also names some farm owners on outskirts of Nashville. Red lines indicate water levels of Cumberland River and the limits of jurisdiction of the Nashville Board of Health. Wilbur F. Foster is noted as the City Engineer. This map is produced on the heels of the devastating Memphis yellow fever epidemics of the 1870s and indicates growing awareness in Tennessee municipalities of the need for better public sanitation to prevent disease. Wilbur F. Foster served as city engineer from 1865 to 1884. He also served as a chief engineer in during the Civil War under General A. P. Stewart."

  • Apr 29, 2021

    1881

    June 19,1881 Daily American Sun article

    Nashville celebrated the 100th anniversary of its founding in 1880; the city’s population was 43,350.  This article published in 1881 highlights the home of Dr. Boyd McNairy, one of the original founders of the Nashville Academy of Medicine in 1821, and shares how he hosted many social events at his Summer Street home, often coined "Nashville's guest house."

    In 1813, an injured man arrived at the home during a party, ".. gaunt, yellow-visaged, prostrate, with his arm bound." The man was Andrew Jackson and he had just been injured in a duel. He remained in the home's large parlor for several weeks while he healed. It is said that the party's guests "never forgave the general" for spoiling their party. 

    "According to the custom of those days, the Doctor's office was in a small building a few steps from the dwelling. It was a cozy little place of two rooms, both fronting on the street and was set, like the large house in a surrounding of grassy lawn and beds of flowers..."

  • May 7, 2021

    1882-1883- TMA President Dr. W. F. Glenn

  • Apr 29, 2021

    1882

    Many early physicians were purveyors of patent medicines, even some with medical school educations. Homeopaths often built their practice around various forms of botanics and a person's natural ability to heal itself. The message among traditional physicians and homeopaths was, during the time, very similar: with a little study, health and healthy living does not have to be complex. To the right is an example of an early advertisement for a physician-branded medicine.

    1882 Nashville Banner drug advertisement

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. John Wesley Maddin - 1886 NAM President

    Dr. John W. Maddin was a highly respected Nashville doctor and surgeon. He served in the Civil War as a surgeon with the thirty-fifth Alabama regiment and later the thirtieth Texas cavalry. After moving to Nashville, he practiced medicine with his brother, Dr. Thomas L. Maddin, NAM president 1869 and Tennessee Medical Association president 1885-1886. Dr. John Maddin passed away exactly one week after his brother.


    John Wesley Maddin, MD, 1834-1908; May 5, 1908 Tennesseean obituary

  • May 7, 2021

    1886-1887 - TMA President Dr. W. T. Briggs

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Thomas A. Atchison - 1887 NAM President

    Dr. Thomas A. Atchison served as chair of the joint medical departments of the University of Nashville and Vanderbilt University until the two colleges separated. Dr. Thomas A. Atchison was the uncle of Dr. William A. Atchison, 1888 NAM president. 


    Thomas A. Atchison, MD, 1818-1900

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. William A. Atchison - 1888 NAM President

    Dr. William A. Atchison was the nephew and business partner of Dr. Thomas A. Atchison, 1888 NAM president.


    Nashville Banner obituary for William Atchison, MD, 1831-1911

  • Apr 29, 2021

    1888

    In 1888, the Nashville Academy of Medicine "formally condemned" cigarette smoking. The Academy had earlier appointed a committee to explore the effects of tobacco products on the body. The paper, in its entirety below, was unanimously adopted and was published "as the voice of this body of leading medical gentleman." One population the committee studied was children. Parents were encouraged not to allow their children the opportunity to use tobacco products. 

    April 29, 1888 Daily American article

  • May 7, 2021

    1889-1890 - TMA President Dr. Duncan Eve

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. A. B. Cooke - 1889 NAM President

    Dr. A. B. Cooke was president of the Tennessee Medical Association from 1907-1908.



    April 12, 1907 The Nashville American

  • Apr 29, 2021

    1889

    In 1889, the Tennessee General Assembly passed a law that provided for a State Board of Medical Examiners to issue certificates of qualification to physicians. The board was comprised of six members, two from each of the grand divisions of the state. This law, which was broad in scope, was repealed in 1901 and replaced with a new law that required anyone seeking a medical license to pass an examination that the board administered. A new provision allowed the board to revoke medical licenses for anyone found guilty of "unprofessional or dishonorable conduct." 

    November 16, 1889 Nashville Banner article

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. George H. Price - 1890 NAM President

    Image ID #13262

    George H. Price, MD: 1858 - 1927

  • May 20, 1890

    1890

    The 41st annual American Medical Association meeting was held in Nashville at the Vendome on Church Street. Tennessee's Governor R. L. Taylor was in attendance. One discussion point was whether or not to raise money for a statue honoring Dr. Benjamin Rush, a physician and signer of the Declaration of Independence.

    Front page of the 1890 American Medical Association meeting handbook

  • Apr 29, 2021

    1890

    In 1890, City Hospital opened its doors in the Rolling Mill Hill neighborhood. This was the hospital in the city to serve the general population. Advisors included NAM members Dr. Duncan Eve, Dr. Paul Eve, Jr., and Dr. William Haggard. The hospital later rebranded to become Nashville General Hospital and eventually merged with Meharry Medical College.

    Undated photo of Nashville General Hospital

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. James B. Stephens - 1891 NAM President

    Dr. James B. Stephens received his medical degree from the University of Nashville. Dr. Stephens died returning from a patient's home on Eighth Avenue when the horse drawn buggy he was in was hit by a taxicab. 


    James B. Stephens, MD, 1834-1910

  • 1891

    Dr. William T. Briggs became the third of eight Nashville physicians elected president of the American Medical Association. Dr. Briggs was one of the first  faculty members of the University of Nashville Medical Department, one of the roots that later became Vanderbilt University Medical School.

    May 5, 1891 AMA President's Address

  • 1891

    In January of 1891, the Nashville Academy of Medicine held its first meeting in its new space on Church Street. This was the first time the academy occupied a space of its own, and much fanfare was made over the furnishings and decor. But president Dr. James B. Stephens recognized that dedicated space could be a key to membership growth and was quoted, "We want to enroll every reputable physician in the city."

    January 1891 Nashville Banner article

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. William D. Haggard, Sr. - 1892 NAM President

    Dr. William D. Haggard, Sr., grew up on a farm in Southern Kentucky. In addition to daily farm chores, William also taught school and became the county's tax assessor at age 19. Drawn to medicine, he saved money to attend medical courses in Lebanon and Louisville. He rode horseback to Philadelphia where he finished his medical courses "with distinction" at Jefferson Medical College in 1851. He moved his family to Gallatin where he had a successful practice treating women and children.

    Dr. Haggard was the father of Dr. William Haggard, Jr., who was president of the American Medical Association in 1925-1926. He was also the great uncle of Dr. Henry L. Douglass, NAM president 1943.

    Dr. William D. Haggard, Sr., 1826-1901

  • May 7, 2021

    1895-1896 - TMA President Dr. Giles C. Savage

  • Apr 29, 2021

    1896

    In 1897, the Tennessee Centennial Exposition was held in Nashville to celebrate the state's 100th anniversary (the actual anniversary was in June of 1896, but financial problems held the exposition back a year). Dr. J. D. Plunket, 1877 NAM president, directed the department of Hygiene, Medicine, and Sanitary Appliances at the Exposition.  Dr. John R. Buist, 1903 NAM president, and Dr. S. S. Crockett, 1905 NAM president, also served on this department. The following excerpt describing the department was written in April 1897 in a publication of Seaboard Air Line. “Medicines and all allied sciences are embraced in this department, exhibiting sanitary appliances, medical history, surgical and medical instruments, hospital vehicles and paraphernalia for athletic exercises and physician culture. The department is directed by Dr. J. D. Plunket, chief; Ernest B. Sangree, M.D., Dr. Chas E. Briggs, Dr. J. Cridle Wharton, Dr. J. Y. Crawford, Dr. John R. Buist, Dr. James T Gwathmey.”

    May 31, 1896, The Nashville American

  • Apr 29, 2021

    1897

    Yellow fever struck Tennessee hard in the late 1800s. The disease is largely carried by infected mosquitoes, making the warm summer months particularly troublesome. Nashville imposed a quarantine in 1897 and went to great lengths to rid the city of trash and other items that would attract the mosquitoes. This article, quoting Dr. Paul Eve, former TMA president and Nashville's second AMA president, effectively ended the quarantine in September of 1897. 

    Nashville Banner, September 24, 1897

  • Apr 29, 2021

    1897

    April 1897 Seaboard Airline

    The Tennessee Centennial and International Exposition was an exposition held in Nashville from May 1 – October 31, 1897 in what is now Centennial Park.  More than 100 buildings spanned 200 acres with some photos included below. “The Auditorium, where all congresses, festivals and conventions will be held has a seating capacity of 6,000… Above the colonnades are pleasant balconies from which may be viewed the grand pageants by day and electrical displays and fireworks at night, the tower, 100 feet high, affords a magnificent view of the Exposition and of Nashville.”

    Dr. William Lofland Dudley

    Dr. W. L. Dudley served as Director of Affairs of the Tennessee Centennial and International Exposition and “handled it with such care that no deficit appeared at its end".  Dr. Dudley earned an honorary degree of Doctor of Medicine at Miami Medical College in 1885. He continued his distinguished career at Vanderbilt University from 1886 until his retirement in 1912. Dr. Dudley was also very dedicated to the advancement of college athletics and served as president of the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association from its inception in 1894 until his death in 1914.  Known as the "father of Vanderbilt football" and the "father of Southern football," he was the namesake of Dudley Field (the first dedicated Southern college football stadium). In addition, he was the organizer and president of the University Club.  

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Arch M. Trawick - 1897 NAM President

  • Apr 29, 2021

    1898

    In the spring of 1898, the Catholic diocese of Nashville opened a temporary location for Saint Thomas Hospital on Hayes Street. Capacity was strained quickly, and a new temporary location opened four years later. A revolutionary surgical building was also added, including an amphitheater where up to 500 students could watch surgeries as they were happening. Many local physicians began moving their practices to Saint Thomas, recognizing the advantage of hospital care to patients post-surgery. Some of the first physicians to move practices included Dr. William Haggard (1892 NAM President), Dr. Lucius Burch (1906 NAM President), and Dr. Harrison Shoulders (1927 NAM President and 1946 AMA President). In 2020 the hospital was rebranded Ascension Saint Thomas West Hospital.

    St. Thomas Hospital, around 1902

  • Apr 29, 2021

    1901

    In June of 1901, the first female was admitted into the Nashville Academy of Medicine. While no record of her name exists, an op-ed was written to the Nashville Banner on June 17 decrying her membership. The author, also unnamed, states, “Women in their proper places and in their normal relations are a perennial blessing .. but out of place and improperly or inaptly associated they simply play the devil.” Times have undoubtedly changed and NAM has a long history of supporting women in medicine.



    Nashville Banner op-ed, June 17,1901

  • May 7, 2021

    1901-1902 - TMA President Dr. Deering J. Roberts

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. John R. Buist - 1903 NAM President

    Dr. John R. Buist was a member of the Nashville City Board of Health and the State Board of Health. One of Dr. Buist's primary research interests was city water filtration efforts. He visited St. Louis to study what was being done to establish a clean water system in that city. The findings he wrote about were presented to the City Board in his absence shortly before his death and were well received. Dr. Buist passed away within hours of receiving this news.

     
    John R. Buist, MD, 1834-1905

  • May 7, 2021

    1904-1905 - TMA President Dr. Paul F. Eve, Jr.

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Sidney Scales Crockett - 1905 NAM President

    Dr. Sidney Scales Crockett earned his medical degree from Vanderbilt University in 1885. At the time of his death. Dr. Crockett held a chair at Vanderbilt University in the field of nervous diseases.

    Sidney Scales Crockett, MD, 1863-1928

  • Apr 29, 2021

    1905

    Tuberculosis - historically called consumption - was not a well-understood disease until the late 1800s. Many thought the disease was genetic and patients often sought out sanatoriums to find rest as a cure. In 1905, Dr. J. A. Witherspoon, a future president of TMA and the fifth AMA president from Nashville, penned this article about his desire for physicians to use newspapers to promote tuberculosis' highly infectious nature and the basic tenets of good hygiene as prevention. Comparing the efforts to stop yellow fever and smallpox to a more deadly tuberculosis, Dr. Witherspoon states, ".. it would create a panic which would blanch the cheeks of the bravest, paralyze business and stop the wheels of commerce, the most stringent measures would be indorsed (sic) and enforced regardless of cost." 

    The Nashville American, January 30, 1905

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Lucius E. Burch - 1906 NAM President

    Dr. Lucius E. Burch was a noted obstetrician, gynecologist, and surgeon. During World War II, Dr. Burch joined the Army Medical Corps and was quickly made chief of surgery in an American base in France. When Dr. Burch entered the army, he was dean of the medical school at Vanderbilt University, a post he returned to when the war was over. In 1925, Dr. Burch was named professor and head of the department of obstetrics and gynecology.


    Lucius E. Burch, MD, 1874-1959

  • Apr 28, 2021

    1906

    The Nashville Medical Society was chartered on September 4, 1906, by the state of Tennessee as the "Nashville Academy of Medicine & Davidson County Medical Society." 

     
    1906 Charter Incorporation of the Nashville Academy of Medicine

  • Apr 27, 2021

    1907

    In 1907, the Nashville Academy of Medicine donated the private library of Dr. Richard Douglas, consisting of 2,500 volumes to the library at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine which had opened in 1906. Dr. Douglas served as Professor of Gynecology and Obstetrics and later Professor of Abdominal Surgery at Vanderbilt. This nucleus has been augmented by generous gifts of local physicians. This collection remains today at the Annette and Irwin Eskind Biomedical Library.

    Dr. Richard Douglas, 1860-1908

  • Apr 27, 2021

    1908

    In December of 1908 the Federation of Women's Clubs asked physicians from the Nashville Academy of Medicine to lend their time speaking to students at Nashville schools. At least five NAM presidents are mentioned in the article. Most used the opportunity to speak about the prevention of tuberculosis and how to practice good hygiene.  

    Nashville Banner, December 1, 1908

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. J. M. King - 1910 NAM President

    Dr. J. M. King was a specialist in skin diseases in Nashville. Dr. King was part of the governor's Pure Food Convention that met in Washington, D.C. 

  • Apr 28, 2021

    1910

    In the first decade of 20th century, meetings were held at the Carnegie Library of Nashville, at 225 Polk Ave, which opened on September 19, 1904.  Several years later, meetings were held at the Tulane Hotel, which was built in 1894 and is photographed below in 1957 shortly before its demolition. 

    Nashville's Tulane Hotel, circa 1957

  • Apr 22, 2021

    1910

    Meharry opened its own George W. Hubbard Hospital as its students were barred from Nashville's City Hospital. Andrew Carnegie donated to help complete the hospital's building as the Flexner Report of 1910 had commended Meharry on its medical school and clinical offerings, one of only two African-American medical colleges to meet the academic standards of the report.

    Historical marker at Meharry Medical College

  • Apr 22, 2021

    1911

    Leading up to the summer of 1911, the Nashville Academy of Medicine appointed a commission to communicate to Nashville families how to secure pure milk for their infants. In particular, the commission was to establish "pure milk depots for the free distribution of clean, germless milk to the infants of the city's poor." Members of the commission included Dr. A. B. Cooke (1889 NAM President and 1907 TMA President) and Dr. William D. Haggard (1892 NAM President, 1913 TMA President, and 1925 AMA President).  

    April 26, 1911 Tennessean article

  • Apr 22, 2021

    1913

    Dr. John A. Witherspoon became the fourth of eight Nashville physicians elected president of the American Medical Association. Dr. Witherspoon was also one of the founders of Vanderbilt's medical school.

    Dr. John A. Witherspoon, 1864-1929

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. W. E. Hibbert - 1915 NAM President

  • Apr 28, 2021

    1916

    The Nashville Academy of Medicine housed its offices in The Doctors’ Building, which was built in 1916 at 710 Church Street, and housed many of the NAM member physician offices through the 1950s. Dr. Matthew McGannon, professor of surgery at Vanderbilt University and officer of the Tennessee-Hermitage Bank, saw a need for a large modern building to serve the city’s rapidly expanding medical community. Dr. McGannon commissioned the local architectural firm of Doughtery and Gardner. Their commercial interpretation of the Renaissance Revival style produced a functional yet ornate office building. Built around a large central lightwell, the most striking feature of the building is its exterior sheathing of glazed terra cotta featuring wreaths, swags, urns, garlands, and lion leads. Along the third story cornice are shields based on the Medici family coat of arms. The Medici family of fifteenth-century Florence, Italy, was known as doctors, hence the name “Medici,” a derivative of the Italian word "medico," or doctor.

    Doctor's Building 

  • May 7, 2021

    1916-1917 - TMA President Dr. Charles Norris Cowden

  • Apr 28, 2021

    1917

    After the United States entered World War I, more than 15,000 Davidson County men and women served.  Like many physicians of the time, Dr. William McCabe left his position at Nashville's City Hospital to serve in World War I, then called the Great War. He led a team of physicians, many local to Nashville, to serve the wounded, pioneering modern war time triage practices. In this 2017 Tennessean article highlighting Dr. McCabe's journal entries, he is shown in two pictures with notable Nashvillians including Dr. W. G. Kennon (1935 NAM President), Dr. J. O. Manier (1929 NAM President), and Dr. H. M. Tigert, who is one of the signors of the 1906 Nashville Medical Society charter.


    2017 Tennessean article about troops fighting in WWI

  • Apr 28, 2021

    1917

    In spite of the creation of a board of health many years prior, Nashville still dealt with unsanitary sewage conditions in 1917. As an example, there were over 12,500 "open privies" throughout the city due to a lack of sewer mains, which also impacted the quality of the clean water supply. The Nashville Academy of Medicine issued a letter to all citizens with the findings of a survey taken in 1916. Two conclusions drawn was that the high typhoid death rate in the city was due to poor sewage control as was "the unduly high death rate from enteritis in children under two years of age." The academy, along with two other professional organizations, appealed to the city's commissioners to consider issuing a $750,000 bond for a comprehensive sewage system throughout the city. The letter was signed by Dr. J. A. Witherspoon, Dr. W. D. Haggard, and Dr. J. W. Jobling.

     

    January 20, 1917, Tennessean article 

     

     

  • Apr 29, 2021

    1918

    Many of Nashville's original hospitals had their origins in religious or other charitable groups. Protestant Hospital arose at this time, a facility planned by the Ministers' Alliance of Nashville. The hospital served both those who could pay and those who could not pay, and additional space was added in 1924. After World War II, the hospital, like many others, was faced with financial troubles and joined forces with the Tennessee Baptist Convention, which already operated a hospital on Eighth Avenue. The two hospitals eventually became Baptist Hospital. In 2002, Baptist Hospital joined Saint Thomas Health's regional network, becoming a member of Ascension Health. In 2013, the hospital was rebranded to Saint Thomas Health Midtown Hospital. 

    Baptist Hospital around 1940

  • Apr 29, 2021

    1920

    In 1920, Tennessee became “the perfect 36,” by casting the deciding vote for ratification of the 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution, guaranteeing American women the right to vote. The vote by the General Assembly followed a lengthy political debate in Nashville, with both support and opposition taking up residence at the Hermitage Hotel. Tennessee female physicians also played a pivotal role in the passage of the 19th Amendment.  One of those was Dr. Mattie E. Coleman (1870-1943) as described in the article, "Women Physicians and the Suffrage Movement."

    "Dr. Mattie E. Coleman was one of Tennessee’s first female physicians. She married a minister in the Colored Methodist Episcopal Church in 1902 and subsequently graduated from Meharry Medical College in 1906. After receiving her medical degree, Dr. Coleman opened her own practice and dedicated much of her effort to helping those in need, a reflection of her strong Christian beliefs... Dr. Coleman took on an active role in the Colored Methodist Episcopal Church, eventually becoming President of the Woman’s Connectional Missionary Council, a position that she held for more than 2 decades. She empowered women of all colors to unite and work together. Known for “building biracial alliances,” which was unusual at the time, Dr. Coleman worked with white women leaders who supported social service programs for the African American community. In return, Dr. Coleman helped secure a block of votes by influencing more than 2500 black women to vote in the 1919 Nashville, Tennessee, municipal elections, the first time women in Tennessee were granted the right to vote in municipal elections."

    Dr. Mattie Eliza Coleman
  • Apr 28, 2021

    1921

    In 1921, three additional floors were added to the original three-story Doctor's building. In 1922, the name of The Doctors' Building which housed many of Nashville's physicians was renamed the Lambuth Building in honor of Bishop Walter Lambuth, who was a doctor as well as a preacher and missionary before he was a bishop. The Nashville Academy still has possession of the handwritten roll books and minute records from the early 1900’s around the organization’s 100th anniversary. This image below shows the attendance records of NAM members in 1923-1924 and also notes their office locations primarily in the Lambuth Building.

    NAM member attendance ledger 

  • May 7, 2021

    1922-1923 - TMA President Dr. H. M. Tigert

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. David R. Pickens - 1923 NAM President

    An excerpt from the book, Tennessee and Tennesseans reads, "David R. Pickens, M.D. Representing one of the oldest families of Marshall County, Dr. Pickens has been extending the recognition of the name in the field of medicine and surgery, and is accounted one of the ablest young surgeons of Nashville, where he has had prominent connections and a large practice... Dr. Pickens when a boy attended Webb school and later took two years in the literary department of the Vanderbilt University. From that he began the study of medicine, and was graduated M.D. in 1907. His first experience was in the city hospital at Nashville, and he also spend two years with Dr. R.E. Fort in the latter's private hospital. In 1910, he established himself in independent practice, and has since enjoyed unusual success. He has made a specialty of surgery and is at the present time instructor in surgery in the Vanderbilt University."

    Dr. David R. Pickens was the father of 1975 NAM president, Dr. David R. Pickens, Jr.

    David R. Pickens, MD, 1882-1944

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Sam Cowan - 1924 NAM President

    Dr. Sam Cowan received his medical degree from Vanderbilt University in 1909. He was a well known obstetrician in Nashville.

    Sam Cowan, MD, 1884-1963

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Howard King - 1925 NAM President


    C. Howard King, MD, 1889-1977

  • Apr 22, 2021

    1925

    Dr. William D. Haggard, Jr., became the fifth of eight Nashville physicians elected president of the American Medical Association. Dr. Haggard earned his medical degree from the University of Tennessee in 1893 and was professor of clinical surgery at Vanderbilt from 1912 until his death. He was founder and president of the Southern Surgical Association and past president of the American College of Surgery.

    Dr. Haggard's father, Dr. William D. Haggard, Sr., was NAM president in 1892, and Dr. Haggard's nephew, Dr. Henry L. Douglass, was NAM president in 1943.


    William D. Haggard, Jr., MD, FACS, 1872-1940

  • May 7, 2021

    1925-1926 - TMA President Dr. W. C. Dixon

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. J. D. McKinney - 1926 NAM President

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Harrison H. Shoulders - 1927 NAM President

    Dr. Harrison Shoulders was a prominent surgeon in Nashville. He went on to become the sixth of eight American Medical Association presidents from Nashville. Dr. Shoulders received his medical degree from Vanderbilt University. He was also the brother of Dr. Heddy Shoulders, 1936 NAM president. 

     
    Harrison H. Shoulders, MD, 1886-1963

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Robert Sullivan - 1928 NAM President

    Dr. Robert Sullivan was a Nashville optometrist. 


    Robert Sullivan, MD

  • Apr 22, 2021

    1928

    In May of 1928 the Nashville Academy of Medicine Alliance (NAMA) was established by a group of physician spouses to volunteer their time and resources to improve the health of the people of Nashville. The group was officially chartered in 1971 and became part of the Tennessee Medical Association Alliance. Early members rolled bandages during WWII and promoted the Salk polio vaccine. In later years, NAMA supported community education in the form of seat belt awareness, smoking cessation, high school career days, and annual support of events related to heart disease awareness. The group met often and issued regular newsletters highlighting their numerous activities. The organization formally dissolved in 2014 and distributed its assets to charities and foundations with the majority of funds going to The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee.

         

          

         

    Photos from decades of service by NAMA members

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. John O. Manier - 1929 NAM President

    Dr. John O. Manier was president of the Tennessee Medical Association from 1934-1935.


    John O. Manier, MD, 1887-1956

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. T. G. Pollard - 1930 NAM President

    Dr. T. G. Pollard graduated from the University of Nashville medical school in 1901. He was a noted surgeon in Nashville.

     
    T. G. Pollard, MD, 1877-1967

  • Apr 22, 2021

    1930

    Among NAM membership meeting notes from the 1930s was this letter to president Dr. T. G. Pollard alerting him to a commercial advertisement for Dr. Horton Casparis, Chair of the Department of Pediatrics at Vanderbilt University. At the time, physician advertising violated "one of the chief principles of medical ethics." The authors of the letter recommended Dr. Pollard bring the physician to the next NAM meeting "as he shall deem proper." Dr. Casparis' responded to the indictment, offering that he only wanted to serve in an educational capacity and was also caught off guard by the advertisement. No further action seems to have been taken, and a copy of the advertisement was not saved.

     
    May 1930 letter to NAM President Dr. T. G. Pollard and response from Dr. Horton Casparis

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. L. W. Edwards - 1931 NAM President

    Dr. L.W. "Lum" Edwards was NAM's president in 1931 and Tennessee Medical Association president in 1940-1941. In 1988 Dr. Edwards' son, Dr. William Edwards, wrote for the Southern Surgical Association about his father's early education, his involvement in the medical corps during WWI, his role as Vanderbilt's first clinical professor of surgery, and his enjoyment in the mentoring of medical students and residents. Dr. Edwards indicated that his father's proudest accomplishment was restoring the resident training program at Nashville General Hospital, sponsored by Vanderbilt University's School of Medicine. As he states, ".. all measures to bring the two institutions together had failed, and Dr. Edwards was called upon to solve the problem."

       
    Photo of Dr. L. W. Edwards and 1988 article for the Southern Surgical Association

  • May 7, 2021

    1931-1932 - TMA President Dr. Robert Caldwell

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Charles M. Hamilton - 1932 NAM President

    Dr. Charles M. Hamilton was a prominent dermatologist and x-ray specialist. He had worked with Dr. Howard King, 1925 NAM president, and Dr. Robert Buchanan, 1955 NAM president. Dr. Hamilton was president of the Tennessee Medical Association from 1946-1947.


    Charles M. Hamilton, MD, 1890-1957

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. L. J. Caldwell - 1933 NAM President

    L. J. Caldwell, MD, 1877-1962

  • Apr 27, 2021

    1933

    In the 1930’s – 1950’s some Nashville physicians began moving their offices away from The Doctors’ Building/The Lambuth Building and opening free-standing clinic locations around the city. This post is in honor of Dr. Ray C. Bunch, whose family donated these items for display during NAM’s 200th anniversary. The images below show a notice of his office move in 1933, a front view of the office, a photo of the office lobby, Dr. Bunch and staff outside of the office, an exam room, a 1941 record of visits, a medical record visiting list with Dr. Bunch's name embossed on the inside, and iron signage outside of the office. These images give a view of how a Nashville physician’s office looked and operated in the 1930s.
                          

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. John M. Lee - 1934 NAM President

    Dr. John Lee served as one of six physicians on the Tennessee State Board of Health when it was reorganized in 1935.

    John M. Lee, MD, 

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. W. G. Kennon, Sr. - 1935 NAM President

    Dr. W. G. Kennon received his medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1908. Dr. Kennon served in WWI as an army lieutenant in the medical corps. Upon returning to Nashville, Dr. Kennon became an associate professor of ophthalmology at Vanderbilt  and later a professor of clinical otolaryngology. 

     
    W. G. Kennon, MD, 1883-1946

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Heddy S. Shoulders - 1936 NAM President

    Dr. Heddy S. Shoulders was the brother of Dr. Harrison H. Shoulders, 1927 NAM president and 1946-1947 AMA president. Dr. Shoulders received his medical degree from Vanderbilt in 1912 and ran a successful radiology practice in Nashville.

    Heddy S. Shoulders, MD, 1889-1973

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Jack Witherspoon - 1937 NAM President

  • Apr 27, 2021

    1937

    One of the earliest known husband and wife NAM members were Dr. Edna Scott Pennington and Dr. Jefferson Cumley Pennington. Dr. Edna Pennington was a well known Nashville allergist and Dr. Jefferson Pennington was a surgeon. The couple had three boys, all of whom became physicians. Dedicated to medicine until the end, Dr. Edna Pennington's obituary states that she donated her body to "medical science."


    1937-1938 NAM member composite

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. W. Bush Anderson - 1938 NAM President

    W. Bush Anderson, MD, 1873-1967

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Ray Wallace Billington - 1939 NAM President

    Dr. Ray Wallace Billington was the first orthopedic surgeon in Nashville. In 1912 he helped found the Junior League Home for Crippled Children. In 1917 he volunteered to serve in WWI and performed specialized orthopedic work.  

     
    Ray Wallace Billington, MD, 1880-1962; April 14, 1946 Tennessean article 

  • Apr 27, 2021

    1939

    Program from a 1939 NAM meeting.

     

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Robert R. Brown - 1940 NAM President

    Dr. Robert R. Brown was one of the south's most respected orthopedic surgeons and was an assistant professor at Vanderbilt University. Dr. Brown served in WWI. Upon his return, he went into private practice with Dr. Duncan Eve, Tennessee Medical Association president from 1889-1890.


    Robert R. Brown, MD, 1890-1945; January 4, 1940 Tennessean article

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Nat S. Shofner - 1941 NAM President

    Dr. Nat S. Shofner was president of the Tennessee Medical Association from 1949-1950.

    Nat S. Shofner, MD, 1895-1969

  • Apr 27, 2021

    1941

    Tuberculosis (TB) - frequently called consumption - is an infectious disease and was greatly feared well into the 20th century because it was often fatal. By 1943 it was the third leading cause of death in Tennessee. The "White Plague" was so named because of its strikingly pale victims. Inglewood residents in Nashville fought the location of a TB hospital in their neighborhood, claiming that property values would plummet. Around 1900, the average hospital stay for a TB patient was three years. Tennessee poet Emma Bell Miles and former President Andrew Jackson died of tuberculosis. Photographed below is Bumpus Hall on the campus of the Middle Tennessee Tuberculosis Hospital in Nashville in 1941.

     
    Bumpus Hall on the campus of the Middle Tennessee Tuberculosis Hospital, Nashville, 1941 
    GP 44, Governor Prentice Cooper Papers

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Carl S. McMurray - 1942 NAM President

    Dr. Carl S. McMurray graduated from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine at age 21. Dr. McMurray was a specialist in surgery and gynecology and an assistant professor at both Vanderbilt and Meharry. 

     
    Carl S. McMurray, MD, 1896-1957

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Henry L. Douglass - 1943 NAM President

    Dr. Henry L. Douglass was a urologist and the nephew of 1892 NAM, 1913-1914 TMA, and 1925-1926 AMA president Dr. William D. Haggard.

    In November 1981, Dr. Douglass was interviewed by Ophelia Paine as part of the Historic Nashville, Inc. 1910-1935 Oral History Project. An excerpt can be heard here, where Dr. Douglass describes health care in Nashville during the late 1890s, his mother's treatment for cancer, and her subsequent death. In another excerpt, he discusses working as an assistant to "young Dr. Haggard" in downtown Nashville, where he learned to do anesthesia, earning $50 a month and rent to live above the doctor's office on Eighth Avenue. The complete interview, as well an index, is available in the Special Collections Division at the Nashville Public Library, who owns the rights to these interviews.

    Henry L. Douglass, MD, 1891-1990

  • May 7, 2021

    1943-1944 - TMA President Dr. O. N. Bryan

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Murray B. Davis - 1944 NAM President

    Murray B. Davis, MD, 1894-1952

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Beverly Douglas - 1945 NAM President

    Dr. Beverly Douglas was the only plastic surgeon in Nashville for many years. He developed a procedure coined the Beverly Douglas Operation that helped save the lives of short-jawed infants. 


    Beverly Douglas, MD, 1919-1970

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. George K. Carpenter, Sr. - 1946 NAM President


    George K. Carpenter, Sr., MD, 1897-1978; April 14, 1946 Tennessean article 

  • Apr 23, 2021

    1946

    In 1946, Dr. Harrison Shoulders became the sixth of eight Nashville physicians elected president of the American Medical Association. Dr. Shoulders served continuously as a delegate with the Tennessee State Medical Association from 1930 to 1938 and was secretary and editor of its Journal from 1927 to 1945.


    Dr. Harrison Shoulders, 1886-1963

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. John C. Burch - 1947 NAM President

    Dr. John C. Burch was the son of 1906 Nashville Academy of Medicine president Dr. Lucius Burch. Dr. Burch was a skilled teacher and practitioner. His book Hysterectomy is considered a classic. As a teacher, he taught 2,000 medical students trained more than 300 residents and interns.

     
    John C. Burch, MD, 1900-1977

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. W. W. Wilkerson, Jr. - 1948 NAM President

    Dr. William W. Wilkerson was eye, ear, nose, and throat specialist with a special interest in children with hearing impairments. Dr. Wilkerson opened a clinic to teach speech and communication skills to children. The board of directors later voted to change the name to the Bill Wilkerson Center in memory of Dr. Wilkerson's 19 year old son who died in WWII. The center merged with Vanderbilt University in the late 1990s and is now called the Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center for Otolaryngology and Communication Sciences.

    William W. Wilkerson, MD, 1897-1961

  • Apr 23, 2021

    1948

    Dr. Olin West became the seventh of eight Nashville physicians elected president of the American Medical Association. Dr. West served as the first secretary of the State Department of Public Health and was later the state commissioner of health. He also served 24 years as secretary of the American Medical Association. 

    Dr. Olin West, 1874-1952

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Daugh W. Smith - 1949 NAM President

    Dr. Daugh Smith was president of the Tennessee Medical Association from 1952-1953. Dr. Smith was also one of the founders of Harpeth Hall School in Nashville. 

    Daugh W. Smith, MD, -1983

  • Apr 29, 2021

    1950

    In 1950 Jack Ballentine became Executive Secretary of NAM. He served until 1954.

    Jack Ballentine, -1984

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Cleo Miller - 1950 NAM President

    Dr. Cleo Miller began his first medical practice in a home at 1308 Stratton Avenue in East Nashville. Miller Clinic, which he established in 1937, was the nearest medical facility for East Nashville residents. Dr. Miller added a hospital to the clinic in 1962. In 1968 HCA purchased Miller Hospital and rebranded it Edgefield Hospital. 

    Dr. Miller and his wife built a Tudor Revival home in Inglewood which is now on the National Register of Historic Properties.  A street in East Nashville is also named in Dr. Miller's memory.

    Cleo Miller, MD, 1903-1973

  • Apr 29, 2021

    1950

    In 1950, The Nashville Academy Medicine encouraged the public school system to ban soda pop and candy bars from all schools.

    Nashville Banner, June 9, 1950

  • Apr 29, 2021

    1950

    In December 1950, the U. S. Treasury recognized the incorporation of the The Nashville Academy of Medicine in 1906 and further exempted the organization from Federal income tax under the provisions of section 101(7). The Nashville Academy of Medicine is now recognized as a 501(c)6. 


    December 1950 nonprofit status approval

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Rudolph H. Kampmeier - 1951 NAM & Davidson County Medical Society President

    Dr. Kampmeier was president of the Tennessee Medical Association from 1964-1965. He was also past president of the American College of Physicians and the Southern Medical Association. 

     
    Rudolph H. Kampmeier, MD, 1898-1990

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Hollis E. Johnson - 1952 NAM President

    Dr. Hollis Johnson was a leader in the treatment of tuberculosis and established the Clinic for Tuberculosis Children. Dr. Johnson was also founder and past president of both the Nashville and Tennessee Thoracic Societies. 


    Hollis E. Johnson, MD, 1894-1990

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. W. O. Tirrill, Jr. - 1953 NAM President


    W. O. Tirrill, Jr., MD, 1906-1987

  • Apr 22, 2021

    1953

    The Nashville Academy of Medicine hosted a booth at the Tennessee State Fair.

    Image of NAM booth at 1953 state fair

  • Apr 22, 2021

    1953

    After nuclear bombs were first used in WWII, physicians around the world began developing response plans to treat a new type of patient. Tennessee engaged physicians across the state through courses related to atomic bomb injury care, as highlighted in this 1953 article. Dr. James Gardner, NAM's 1956 president and quoted in the below article, offered that rural physicians particularly needed the course because urban areas were more likely targets and the job handling causalities would "fall on the physicians and hospitals in adjacent areas."

    September 7, 1953 Nashville Banner article

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Charles C. Trabue, IV - 1954 NAM President

    Dr. Charles Trabue, IV, served as president of the Tennessee Medical Association from 1955-1956. During WWII, Dr. Trabue served as vice chief and later chief of surgery in the 300th General Hospital, known as the Vanderbilt unit, which spanned from North Africa to Italy. In 1953 he was appointed by the state legislature to study the feasibility of merging Nashville and Davidson County.  

     
    Charles C. Trabue, IV, MD, 1906-1986; April 12, 1955 Tennessean article, Dr. Trabue is third from left

  • Apr 29, 2021

    1954

    In 1954 Jack Drury became Executive Secretary of NAM. He served until 1973.

    Jack Drury

  • Apr 29, 2021

    1954

    The Nashville Academy of Medicine amended its constitution and bylaws to welcome African American physicians into membership, the first chapter in Tennessee to do so. In February of 1955, three members of the Meharry faculty joined the organization - Dr. Axel Hansen, Dr. E. Perry Crump, and Dr. Matthew Walker.

         
    Dr. Axel Hansen, Dr. E. Perry Crump, and Dr. Matthew Walker

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Robert N. Buchanan, Jr. - 1955 NAM President

    Dr. Robert "Dr. Buck" Buchanan was called into active duty in 1942 and served in North Africa, Italy, Iran, France, and eventually the entire Mediterranean theatre. Upon his return he joined the faculty at Vanderbilt University and later served as president of the Association of Professors of Dermatology. 


    Robert N. Buchanan, Jr., MD, 1911-2004

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. James C. Gardner - 1956 NAM President

    Dr. James C. Gardner was president of the Tennessee Medical Association from 1958-1959.


    James C. Gardner, MD, 1900-1987

  • Apr 28, 2021

    1956

    In 1956, the Nashville Academy of Medicine and Davidson County Medical Society relocated its offices to 112 Louise Avenue (near the current location of Caterpillar Financial and West End United Methodist Church), where its offices remained until 1975.

    Notice of NAM activities at new location

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. William O. Vaughan - 1957 NAM President

    Dr. William O. Vaughan was president of the Tennessee Medical Association from 1961-1964. Dr. Vaughan also served as president of the Tennessee Pediatric Society and Nashville Pediatric Society. 

     
    William O. Vaughan, MD, 1906-1975

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. William G. Kennon - 1958 NAM President

    Dr. William Kennon was an otolaryngologist at Vanderbilt and was one of the first physicians nationally to treat deafness with a surgical procedure called stapes mobilization. 


    William G. Kennon, MD, 1916-2002

  • Apr 28, 2021

    1958

    In June 1958, groundbreaking began for the John J. Lentz Health Center at 311 23rd Avenue North, officiated with Nashville Mayor West and County Judge Briley and other dignitaries. Dr. John J. Lentz was director of Health for the Davidson County Health Department. The new facility became the main clinic for public health activities of Nashville and Davidson County.  Dr. Lentz started his career as a country doctor in 1906 and became director of public health for Davidson County in December, 1920.  Dr. Lentz retired as head of the Metropolitan Government of Nashville & Davidson County Health Department in 1964, after spending over 40 years working to improve the public health of its citizens. 
    A 1955 Nashville Banner profile of Dr. Lentz asked “Why public health?” His answer: “I lost a sister with diphtheria and a father with lockjaw.” Dr. Lentz spent his career campaigning for many causes, most notably polio vaccinations. The Lentz Public Health Center still bears his name today.

      

     

  • Apr 28, 2021

    1958

    The Nashville Academy of Medicine has a long history of educating and serving the public. In 1958, NAM collaborated with the city and local fire departments to offer free diabetes screenings at no cost to anyone who wanted to be tested. The informational article below was a regular feature in the Tennessean

    November 16, 1958 Tennessean article

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Rollin A. Daniel, Jr. - 1959 NAM President

    Dr. Rollin Daniel, Jr., was a pioneer in thoracic surgery. He served as president of the Nashville Surgical Society and the Middle Tennessee Heart Association.

     
    Rollin A. Daniel, Jr., MD, 1908-1978

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Thomas S. Weaver - 1960 NAM President


    Thomas S. Weaver, MD, 1910-1978

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Laurence A. Grossman - 1961 NAM President

    While Dr. Grossman was president of the Nashville Academy of Medicine, he led the movement to further integrate the society, making NAM one of the first societies in the South to admit African American members. In 1947, Dr. Grossman had opened the city’s first integrated medical clinic on the third floor of the downtown Doctor’s Building. At the time, African Americans had few options for medical treatment and the only hospitals open to them were Hubbard Hospital and Nashville General Hospital. Dr. Grossman felt compelled to open his integrated clinic as a result of his experience treating black troops during World War II, where he served as an Army surgeon. Dr. Grossman also helped establish Saint Thomas Health Services. 

     
    Laurence A. Grossman, MD, 1917-2006 

  • Apr 29, 2021

    1962

    Polio (poliomyelitits) had been a scourge of the first half of the 20th century, a disease that compromised the nervous and respiratory systems, paralyzing arms and legs and sometimes causing death. The disease was often called "infant paralysis" because of its prevalence in children. An injectable vaccine was created in the 1950s, but an effective oral version was created in the early 1960s. There was quite a bit of vaccine hesitancy nationwide. In the fall of 1962, the Nashville Academy of Medicine launched a campaign to vaccinate 300,000 residents, or three fourths of the city's population. Dr. James Thomasson, NAM's future 1965 president, is mentioned discussing the requested 25-cent contribution by residents but offering that no one would be turned away because of an inability to contribute.


    July 29, 1962 Tennessean article

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Joseph M. Ivie, Sr. - 1962 NAM President


    Joseph M. Ivie, Sr., MD, 1912-1997

  • Apr 29, 2021

    1963

    In the fall of 1963, Nashvillians were still being encouraged to get vaccinated from polio. The Nashville Academy of Medicine formed a committee to support mass vaccination events around the city. NAM sought nurses of all levels and experience to help with events in October, November, and December. 

    September 21, 1963 Nashville Banner article

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Walter Diveley - 1963 NAM President

     
    Walter Diveley, MD, -1981

  • Apr 29, 2021

    1963

    Medicine and music are never far apart in Music City. In this Medical Tribune article from November, 1963, the Music City Medics are shown performing a charity event in Nashville. The group often provided music for charity functions that could not afford to pay for live music. Though unnamed, all pictured are physicians with the exception of the conductor. Similar groups are said to still perform in Nashville.

    Music City Medics, 1963

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Addison B. Scoville, Jr. - 1964 NAM President

    Dr. Addison Scoville, Jr., was known for his decades of dedication to the treatment of diabetes. He joined Dr. Thomas Frist in private practice to form the Frist-Scoville Medical Group in 1946. The same year, he joined the faculty at Vanderbilt. 


    Addison B. Scoville, Jr., MD, 1914-1998

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. James N. Thomasson - 1965 NAM President


    James N. Thomasson, MD, 1918-1981

  • Apr 29, 2021

    1965

    Nashville Memorial Hospital in Madison opened its doors in 1965. The original building housed 150 beds and was available for general medical patients as well as patients in several specialized areas. Years after completion, a campaign to raise $600,000 covered the expansion of the facility to 211 beds. In April of 1994, The Memorial Foundation was established with an endowment fund generated from the sale of the assets of Nashville Memorial Hospital. At that time, members of the hospital’s Board of Directors became members of the Board of Trust of The Memorial Foundation. Nashville Memorial Hospital closed in 2000. 








    1964 photo of construction on Nashville Memorial Hospital (credit, Jack Corn of The Tennessean) and the completed hospital

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. William F. Meacham - 1966 NAM President

    Dr. William Meacham served as president of Neurosurgical Society of America, the Southern Neurosurgical Society, the Nashville Surgical Society, the Tennessee Surgical Society, the American College of Surgeons, the Society of Neurological Surgeons, and the American Association of Neurological Surgeons. The William F. Meacham Chair in Neurological Surgery at Vanderbilt was established in his honor. 


    William F. Meacham, MD, 1914-1999

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Greer Ricketson - 1967 NAM President

         
    Greer Ricketson, MD,  1917-2007; May 21, 1966 Tennessean article 

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Luther A. Beazley - 1968 NAM President


    Luther A. Beazley, MD, 1922-2003

  • Apr 29, 2021

    1968

    In 1968, Dr. Thomas Frist, Sr., Dr. Thomas Frist, Jr., (both active members of NAM at the time) and venture capitalist Jack Massey founded Hospital Corporation of America (HCA), a healthcare company with the capital and vision of scale to serve quickly growing communities throughout the country. HCA built hospitals in underserved areas, bought and upgraded existing hospitals, and worked with physicians to manage hospitals for other owners. The legacy of 1968 continues today as HCA is one of the nation's leading providers of healthcare services and remains one of the top employers in Nashville.

    Dr. Thomas Frist, Sr., Jack Massey, and Dr. Thomas Frist, Jr. (The Tennessean)

  • Apr 29, 2021

    1968

    In November of 1968, the Nashville Academy of Medicine co-sponsored a health career fair for 90,000 students across Middle Tennessee. The fair offered a chance for students to see firsthand the path to 35 different medical careers. Other sponsors included the Middle Tennessee Hospital Council, South Middle Tennessee Hospital Council, and the Middle Tennessee Education Association. 

    1968 Health Career Fair article

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Louis Rosenfeld - 1969 NAM President


    Louis Rosenfeld, MD, 1911-1999

  • May 7, 2021

    1970-1972 TMA President Dr. Tom E. Nesbitt

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Robert L. Chalfant - 1970 NAM President


    Robert L. Chalfant, MD, 1920-2008

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Robert L. McCracken - 1971 NAM President


    Robert L. McCracken, MD, 1912-2003

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. C. Gordon Peerman - 1972 NAM President

    Dr. Peerman was president of the Tennessee Medical Association from 1976-1977.


    C. Gordon Peerman, MD, 1926-2006

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Frank C. Womack, Jr. - 1973 NAM President


    Frank Womack, Jr., MD, 1915-2000

  • May 7, 2021

    1973-1974 TMA President D. O. Morse Kochtitzky

  • Apr 29, 2021

    1973

    In 1973 John Westenberger became the Executive Director of NAM. He served until 1979.

    John Westenberger, 1941-2018

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. George W. Holcomb, Jr. - 1974 NAM President

    Dr. George Holcomb was president of the Tennessee Medical Association from 1982-1983 and pas president of the Nashville Surgical Society and the Vanderbilt Medical Alumni Association. Dr. Holcomb served in the Korean War as Chief of Thoracic Surgery and earned a Bronze Star Medal for his service. For many years he was the only pediatric surgeon in Middle Tennessee. The annual Holcomb Lectureship in Pediatric Surgery was established in his honor at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. 


    George Holcomb, Jr., MD, 1922-2019

  • Apr 23, 2021

    1974

    In 1974 the Nashville Academy of Medicine moved its home from Louise Avenue, a space shared with the Tennessee Medical Association, to a house on 23rd Avenue North. NAM remained in this location until 2010.

            
    Rendering of 23rd Avenue South location and 1974 deed to property

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. David R. Pickens, Jr. - 1975 NAM President


    David R. Pickens, Jr., MD, 1920-1999

  • Apr 23, 2021

    1975-1976 - TMA President Dr. J. Kelley Avery

  • Apr 23, 2021

    1975

    The Nashville Academy of Medicine launched Tel-Med in 1975. Tel-Med was a nationwide program that provided 3-5 minute taped recordings concerning a variety of health topics. The program was very popular in the Nashville community.


    Tel-Med brochure showing topics available

  • Apr 23, 2021

    1975

    The Metropolitan Historical Commission of Nashville and Davidson County erected Historical Marker Number 61 at the intersection of 23rd Avenue and Brandau Place in commemoration of the Nashville Academy of Medicine. The sign was later updated and placed at the new office of NAM at 3301 West End Ave. 

    Historical Marker Number 61 on 3301 West End Ave
  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Dan S. Sanders - 1976 NAM President

    Dr. Sanders was past president of the Davidson County Pediatric Society and the Tennessee Pediatric Society. 


    Dan Sanders, MD, 1917-2013

  • Apr 30, 2021

    1976

    A few years after NAM's 150th anniversary, an article on the history of the association by Dr. John Thomison appeared in The Tennessean. Dr. Thomsion (1985 NAM President and 1988 TMA President) wrote for the weekly Medical Message segment about the ebbing and flowing of NAM's early history. He concludes by offering that membership "is approaching 900" in 1976. As we celebrate our bicentennial year in 2021, we are proud that nearly 2,300 physician members in 70 specialties now hold membership in NAM.  

    November 22, 1976 Tennessean article

  • Apr 30, 2021

    1976

    The 1970s were a time of fellowship and fun for members at NAM. Newsletters from this decade show registrations and results for an annual tennis tournament, details on a group ski trip to Crested Butte, CO, and a brochure highlighting a special tour of London for NAM members. 

           
    Travel brochures for 1976 tour of London

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. James W. Hays - 1977 NAM President

    Dr. Hays served as president of the Tennessee Medical Association from 1979-1980.


    James W. Hays, MD, 1932-2005; article highlighting TMA service award 

  • Apr 30, 2021

    1977

    In 1977 the Nashville Academy of Medicine took ownership of a medical paging service for local physicians. The member costs included a $100 membership fee plus $3 a month in administrative fees.  

     
    Brochure for medical paging service

  • Apr 30, 2021

    1977

    In 1977, the NAM Board of Directors, with majority support by members, approved the listing of physicians with their specialties in the Nashville Telephone Directory Yellow Pages. The article below highlights NAM's guidelines. 

    Approval of Yellow Page advertising

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. John L. Sawyers - 1978 NAM President

    Dr. Sawyers was national recognized in academic surgery. He served in many roles, including president of the state chapter of the American College of Surgeons and chairman of the Cancer Committee of the American College of Chest Physicians. 


    John Sawyers, MD,  1926-2016

  • May 4, 2021

    1978

    Dr. Tom Nesbitt became the eighth of eight Nashville physicians elected president of the American Medical Association. Dr. Nesbitt was a founding member of Urology Associates. He served in many leadership roles including president of the Tennessee Medical Association, president of the American Association of Clinical Urologists, and he served on the boards of the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Hospitals and the American Hospital Association. 

     
    Tom Nesbitt, MD, 1923-2014; Nashville Banner article June 21, 1978

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Charles M. Hamilton - 1979 NAM President

     

    January 15, 1979 Tennessean article; photo from January 23, 2020 Tennessean

  • Apr 29, 2021

    1979

    In 1979 Raymond Schklar became the Executive Director of NAM. He served until 1983.

    Raymond Schklar

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. B. F. Byrd, Jr. - 1980 NAM President

    Dr. Byrd served as local, state, and national president of the American Cancer Society and was a founding member of the board of overseers for Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center. He served in WWII and earned a Silver Star, Bronze Star, and the Purple Heart for his service. 

     
    B. F. Byrd, Jr., 1918-2006

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Robert W. Ikard - 1981 NAM President


    Robert Ikard, MD, 1938-2016

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Ronald E. Overfield - 1982 NAM President


    Ron Overfield, MD

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Paul R. Stumb - 1983 NAM President


    Paul Stumb, MD, FACP

  • Apr 29, 2021

    1983

    In 1983 Margaret Click became the Executive Director of NAM. She served until 2000.  In 1983, a dinner was held for all past presidents of NAM. In the photo below, Margaret is sitting on the left side of the photo on the arm of the sofa and Raymond Schklar (NAM Executive Director, 1979-1983) is sitting on the right side of the photo on the arm of the sofa.  Presidents in this photo from left to right include:

    Seated: Drs. Henry L. Douglas (1943) and James C. Gardner (1956).
    First Row: Drs. Charles M. Hamilton (1979), Paul R. Stumb, III (1983), Joseph M. Ivie (1962), Rudolph H. Kampmeier (1951), William G. Kennon, Jr. (1958), William F. Meacham (1966), James W. Hays (1977), George W. Holcomb, Jr. (1974), Robert W. Ikard (1981).
    Back Row: Louis Rosenfeld (1969), David R. Pickens, Jr. (1974), Addison B. Scoville, Jr. (1964), Frank W. Womack, Jr. (1973), Robert L. McCracken (1971), Ronald E. Overfield (1982).

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. John K. Wright - 1984 NAM President


    John K. Wright, MD, 1934-2021

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. John B. Thomison - 1985 NAM President

    Dr. John B. Thomison was NAM president in 1985 and TMA president in 1988-1989. The below article from the Tennessee Medical Association introduced Dr. Thomison to the position, outlining his education at Vanderbilt University, his service as a medical officer in WWII, his pathology career at Vanderbilt, and his service to organized medicine at all levels. 

     

     

    Photo of Dr. John B. Thomison and 1988 Tennessee Medical Association article 
    John B. Thomison, MD, 1921-2013

  • May 7, 2021

    1985

    Prior to 1980, the American Medical Association did not permit physicians to advertise their services or their practices. In this Tennessean article from January of 1985, many Nashville practitioners were still reluctant to advertise, lagging behind most other large cities. Former NAM Executive Director Margaret Click is quoted in the article, stating that NAM had not received any complaints about recent hospital advertisements, despite watchdog groups warning of this response. 

    January 27, 1985 Tennessean article

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Kent Kyger - 1986 NAM President


    Kent Kyger, MD

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Sarah H. Sell - 1987 NAM President

    Dr. Sarah Sell became the first female elected president of the Nashville Academy of Medicine. Dr. Sell went on to become the first female president of the American Heart Association in Middle Tennessee and the first woman to serve on the admissions committee for Vanderbilt Medical School.

    Sarah Sell, MD, 1913-2012

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. James M. High - 1988 NAM President

    Dr. High was past president of the Middle Tennessee Heart Association.

    James High, MD,  1927-2004

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Howard L. Salyer - 1989 NAM President


    Howard Salyer, MD

    Dr. Salyer served as president of the Tennessee Medical Association from 1991-1992.

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. T. Guv Pennington - 1990 NAM President


    T. Guv Pennington, MD, FACP,  1929-2012

    Dr. Pennington was a cofounder of Heritage Medical Group of Nashville. He also studied Spanish and volunteered as a physician in the Dominican Republic as well as with Siloam Family Health Center. 

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. R. Benton Adkins, Jr. - 1991 NAM President

    Dr. Adkins served as president of the Tennessee Medical Association from 1997-1998. He was an active member of the armed forces in several capacities, serving on active duty during the Persian Gulf War. Dr. Adkins was a pioneer in the study of surgical care for the elderly. His findings confirmed that elderly, particularly those over age 90, could safely undergo certain surgical procedures.  


    Article introducing TMA's 143rd President, R. Benton Adkins, Jr., MD, 1933-2003 

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Arthur G. Bond - 1992 NAM President


    Arthur Bond, MD, 1933-1994

  • Apr 30, 2021

    1992

    Tennessee Women in Medicine was founded by a group of 10 women physicians in March of 1992. TWM works to engage members to meet, learn, and grow in an effort to encourage the continued excellence of women in medicine. In just three years since its founding, TWM grew to over 150 women and was officially established as a 501(c)6 organization. In 2018 the Nashville Academy of Medicine established a close relationship with TWM by offering services to help manage the association and provide professional support for TWM's growth and success. 

    Former Presidents of Tennessee Women in Medicine
    (*NAM members during their TWM presidency)
    2020-2021 - Alicia A. Hall, MD
    2018-2019 - Laura Lawson, MD*

    2017 - Deborah Beyer, MD
    2016 - Tara Allen, MD*
    2012-2015 - Catherine Thornburg, MD*
    2011 - Susan Morgan, MD
    2010 - Jennifer Kidd, MD
    2009 - Marilynn Michaud, MD
    2008 - Deborah Beyer, MD
    2007 - Dawn Vincent, MD*
    2006 - Nancy Peacock, MD*
    2005 - Michelle Cochran, MD*
    2004 - Robin Williams, MD*
    2003 - Lee Fentriss, MD, FACP*
    2002 - Susan Briley, MD*
    2001 - Ellen Roback, MD*
    2000 - Peggy Elam, PhD
    1998-1999 -Maria Frexes, MD, PhD*
    1997 - Deborah German, MD*
    1996 - Jill Chambers, MD deceased
    1994-1995 - Jennifer Oakley, MD*
    1992-1993 - Lois Wagstrom, MD, PC

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Reuben A. Bueno - 1993 NAM President

    Dr. Bueno was Vanderbilt University Medical School's first Plastic Surgery residency graduate in 1973.


    Reuben Bueno, MD

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Barrett F. Rosen - 1994 NAM President


    Barrett Rosen, MD

    Dr. Rosen served as president of the Tennessee Medical Association from 2000-2001.

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Ann H. Price - 1995 NAM President


    Ann Price, MD, FACP

  • Apr 30, 2021

    1995

    The Nashville Academy of Medicine serves not just physicians. NAM has a long history of providing service and education to the public about medicine in Nashville. For many years, NAM and Leadership Nashville partnered with a mini-internship program matching business leaders with medical professionals. The below article features Dr. John Lamb, president of NAM in 1998

    February 1995 article featuring Dr. Lamb

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. John J. Warner - 1996 NAM President


    John Warner, MD

  • Apr 30, 2021

    1996

    In a November 1996 NAM newsletter, Dr. Stephanie Bailey, then Director of the Metropolitan Health Department, encouraged NAM members and their patients to continue getting influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations as part of the Healthy People 2000 objectives. Dr. Bailey commented, "We are in an interpandemic state, with every reason to believe that another pandemic will occur." 


    November 1996 NAM newsletter

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. David R. Yates - 1997 NAM President


    David Yates, MD

  • Apr 30, 2021

    1997

    In 1997, the Nashville Academy of Medicine and Tennessee Medical Association began admitting members with a Doctor of Osteopathy degree (DO) into membership along with the current members who had a Doctor of Medicine (MD) degree.  This policy still stands today as we welcome all MDs and DOs with an active Tennessee license into membership, as well as those who are in training for one of those degrees.

    Images below show proceeding related to Resolution 24-97 from the 1997 Tennessee Medical Association House of Delegates. A link to the full archived Tennessee Medicine: Journal of the Tennessee Medical Association can be found here

        
    1. April 1997 cover page of Tennessee Medicine: Journal of the Tennessee Medical Association
    2. 1997 list of House of Delegates proceedings
    3. Review of House of Delegates actions regarding the admittance of Doctors of Osteopathy

  • Apr 30, 2021

    1997

    During the mid- to late-1990s, WDCN Channel 8, a precursor to the current Nashville Public Television, ran a series of Medical Town Meetings aimed at educating the public about medical concerns. The Nashville Academy of Medicine was often asked to provide speakers for these programs. 

    March 25, 1997 Tennessean article about Medical Town Meetings

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. John W. Lamb - 1998 NAM President


    John Lamb, MD, 1937-2014

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Lonnie S. Burnett - 1999 NAM President

    Dr. Burnett served in both WW II as a naval cadet and the Korean War as a flight surgeon. After his service was complete, he trained in Obstetrics and Gynecology among the leaders in the field at Johns Hopkins University. In 1976 Dr. Burnett moved to Vanderbilt University to lead the Obstetrics and Gynecology department, and in 1993 The Vanderbilt Ob-Gyn Alumni Association was renamed the Lonnie S. Burnett Society. 


    Dr. Lonnie Burnett, 1927-2012

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. William M. Gavigan - 2000 NAM President


    William Gavigan, MD

  • Apr 29, 2021

    2000

    In 2000 Jack Elder became the Executive Director of NAM. He served until 2003.

    Jack Elder

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Ralph E. Wesley - 2001 NAM President


    Ralph Wesley, MD

  • Apr 29, 2021

    2001

    At its first meeting after the September 11 terror attacks, the Nashville Academy of Medicine heard presentations from Nashville Mayor Bill Purcell, Nashville's Director of Emergency Management Jim Thacker, and Metro Fire Department Chief Stephen Halford, regarding Nashville's preparedness dealing with natural disasters and acts of terrorism. Dr. Stephanie Bailey, Director of Metro's Health Department, also updated physicians on the city's response plans with regard to biological threats and how physicians could assist with preventative, surveillance, and response needs. The front page of the newsletter also acknowledged that physicians might be called to serve the military, with NAM providing their full support.


    October 2001 NAM newsletter

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. John B. Bond - 2002 NAM President


    John Bond, MD, 1931-2017

  • Apr 29, 2021

    2002

    For many years, the Nashville Academy of Medicine printed an annual pictorial physician's directory. NAM is excited to announce that an online physician's directory is coming soon. Look for future communications about this exciting member benefit.


    2002 Tennessean ad 

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Charles W. Eckstein - 2003 NAM President


    Charles Eckstein, MD

  • Apr 22, 2021

    2003

    In 2003 Kasey Anderson became the Executive Director of NAM. She served until 2014.

    Kasey Anderson

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Kenneth Lloyd - 2004 NAM President

     
    Kenneth Lloyd, MD

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Karen Duffy - 2005 NAM President


    Karen Duffy, MD

  • Apr 22, 2021

    2005

    In 2005, Bridges to Care Plus was founded as a charity care program serving Nashville and Davidson County residents. The Nashville Academy of Medicine was instrumental at the founding to organize more than 260 volunteer specialists in Davidson County. The program was created as an expansion of the Metro Public Health Department of Nashville and Davidson County’s Bridges to Care program. Bridges To Care Plus opened up the entire health care network – hospitals, prescription drugs and specialty care – to uninsured Davidson county residents who qualified. Charles Eckstein, MD, former NAM president, spoke during the kick-off event with Stephanie Bailey, MD, who was also a NAM board member and director of the Metro Nashville Public Health Department.

    Click here to read a press release that was released two months later in 2005 as TennCare experienced large shifts around the state.

    Charles Eckstein, MD, and Stephanie Bailey, MD, launching Bridges to Care Plus

    Original Bridges to Care Plus logo

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Jerry Franklin - 2006 NAM President

     
    Jerry Franklin, MD

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. John R. Gibson - 2007 NAM President


    John Gibson, MD

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Michael Zanolli - 2008 NAM President

     
    Michael Zanolli, MD

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. George R. (Trey) Lee, III - 2009 NAM President

     
    George "Trey" Lee, MD, MS, MBA

  • Apr 23, 2021

    2010

    After the sale of the house on 23rd Ave, the Nashville Academy of Medicine moved its offices to 3301 West End Avenue. This office space was located in a historic home on West End Avenue with a meeting and conference room overlooking the prime corridor heading into Nashville. The home was built in 1910 and carried some of the same charm and history that NAM's first office also would have had in the early 1900s. NAM expanded its office needs to include the third floor of the building in 2018 before moving to the current office location in 2020.

    Nashville Academy of Medicine, 2010-2020

  • Apr 23, 2021

    2010

    In May of 2010, a historic flood devastated much of Nashville and Middle Tennessee, shattering nearly every rainfall record ever recorded. More than 10,000 properties were damaged and just as many people were displaced from their homes. Eleven people lost their lives. The Nashville Chamber of Commerce reported the flood caused more than $2 billion in private property damage and $120 million in infrastructure damage. Nashville's medical facilities were not spared: Vanderbilt University Medical Center suffered significant flood damage in three clinics including radiation oncology, neurology, and pulmonology. 

    In spite of the damage, the phrase "Nashville Strong" became a mantra in the city for those rebuilding or helping to rebuild. The Nashville Chamber of Commerce estimates more than 29,000 volunteers gave 375,000 service hours to recovery. The volunteer spirit overflowed and Nashville rebounded spectacularly.      

    I Believe in Nashville mural, 12th Avenue South

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Robert M. Dimick - 2010 NAM President


    Robert Dimick, MD

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Catherine R. Stallworth - 2011 NAM President


    Catherine Stallworth, MD

  • Apr 23, 2021

    2011-2012 TMA President Dr. F. Michael Minch

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Michel A. McDonald - 2012 NAM President

     
    Michel McDonald, MD, MBA

    Michel McDonald, MD, MBA, was the first female to chair the Board of Trustees of the Tennessee Medical Association. In 2015 The Nashville Business Journal interviewed Dr. McDonald during her time of service in that role.

  • May 7, 2021

    Dr. Steven D. Graham - 2013 NAM President


    Steven Graham, MD

  • May 6, 2021

    Dr. Adele M. Lewis - 2014 & 2015 NAM President


    Adele Lewis, MD

  • Apr 22, 2021

    2014

    In 2014 Rebecca Leslie became the Executive Director of NAM, and the board changed her role to CEO in 2018. She is presently still serving in this capacity.

    Rebecca Leslie, MBA

  • Apr 27, 2021

    2015

    In 2015, nearly 100 community and health care leaders joined together for a celebration breakfast on Thursday, October 29, celebrating the impact of Project Access Nashville Specialty Care and the Safety Net Consortium of Middle Tennessee. Guests included decades of health department directors, community foundations, safety net clinic leaders, nonprofit partners, volunteer physicians, hospital representatives, and NAM leadership. The Bridges to Care Plus Program changed its name to Project Access Nashville Specialty Care in 2013 to align in name with 70 similar programs across the country including the other Tennessee programs in Chattanooga, Knoxville, and Upper East Tennessee. Click here to read more about the anniversary celebration.

     



    Photos from October 29, 2015 breakfast

  • May 6, 2021

    Dr. Lee A. Fentriss - 2016 NAM President


    Lee A. Fentriss, MD

  • Apr 27, 2021

    2016

    2016 Board Chair, Adele M. Lewis, MD (left) and 2016 NAM President Lee A. Fentriss, MD (right)

    In 2016, NAM repurposed it's signature event into a President's Reception held in January to install the incoming president of NAM, and recognize physicians who had been practicing medicine for 50 years. This event continues to be one of our favorite events to gather current, future, and past leaders together in celebration.

  • May 6, 2021

    Dr. Ralph Atkinson, III - 2017 NAM President


    Ralph Atkinson, III, MD

  • May 11, 2021

    2017

    Nashville Academy of Medicine Members have remained passionate about grassroots advocacy. We partner closely with the Tennessee Medical Association to promote the best interest of our physician members with the Tennessee State Legislature. Below right, our members are pictured with Speaker of the House Beth Harwell. Below left, Dr. Gregg Shepard testifies before the House Insurance and Banking committee regarding oral chemotherapy parity for his patients as an oncologist. Dr. Shepard is now the President-Elect for NAM, and will assume the role as president in 2022. We appreciate how our members grow into leadership roles and remain involved over the course of many years.

    NAM members with Speaker Beth Harwell

    Gregg Shepard, MD, testifying before the House Insurance and Banking Committee

  • May 11, 2021

    2017

    The Holiday Open House was another event which was a long-time favorite for members to gather and celebrate at the end of the year.  This event brought former presidents and leaders back to visit and catch up with each other and with NAM, while also allowing new members, medical students, and practicing members to meet and build relationships. This event still continues on the first Thursday of December each year.

  • May 6, 2021

    Dr. M. Kevin Smith - 2018 NAM President


    M. Kevin Smith, MD, PhD, MMH

    Dr. Smith also served as President of TMA from 2020-2021. His announcement can be read here.

  • Apr 27, 2021

    2018

    In 2017, NAM continued to plan more social events for our members to connect. In 2017, we planned our first member outing to see the Nashville Sounds in partnership with the Nashville Dental Society. While our game was cancelled due to a tornado warning, and was the last scheduled game of the season, our members were able to gather successfully in 2018 with more than 125 in attendance with their families.

         
    1. Jesse Ehrenfeld, MD, and his father pose with Booster, the Nashville Sounds mascot
    2. The Nashville Sounds scoreboard welcomes Nashville doctors to NAM night at the ballpark.
    3. Jane Siegel, MD, and Rob Dyer, MD
    4. Robin Williams, MD, and Damita Bryant, MD
    5. Andrea Hayes, Executive Director of the Nashville Dental Society and Rebecca Leslie, CEO of the Nashville Academy of Medicine
    6. NAM staff enjoy the game

  • Apr 27, 2021

    2018

    In 2018, the Nashville Academy of Medicine launched the Medical Foundation of Nashville, a 501(c)3, to continue the charitable and educational work of physicians in Middle Tennessee. The Medical Foundation of Nashville empowers our community by supporting health access, promoting healthy lifestyles, championing health and medical education, and cooperating with other charitable entities to work towards a healthier Nashville.  Specific activities include public health education, coordinated charity care (Project Access Nashville Specialty Care), and education for physicians and physicians in training.


     

  • Apr 28, 2021

    Dr. V. Seenu Reddy - 2019 NAM President

    On January 30, 2019, V. Seenu Reddy, MD was officially installed as president of the Nashville Academy of Medicine. Dr. Reddy became the first known physician of Indian origin to be elected to the role as president. Read Dr. Reddy’s press release here


    V. Seenu Reddy, MD, MBA

  • Apr 29, 2021

    2019

    Past President's Program

    On November 2, 2019, NAM invited all former presidents to attend a Past President's Breakfast at Belle Meade Country Club.  V. Seenu Reddy, MD, 2019 NAM President, and Ralph Atkinson, III, MD,  2017 NAM President and Secretary/Treasurer of the Medical Foundation of Nashville shared details of the gala that had been planned for October 2, 2021, to commemorate NAM's 200th Anniversary.


    From L-R: Paul R. Stumb, MD, FACP (1983), Howard L. Salyer, MD (1989), Kenneth Lloyd, MD (2004), Ronald E. Overfield, MD (1982), Barrett F. Rosen, MD (1994), Adele M. Lewis, MD (2014 & 2015), Lee A. Fentriss, MD (2016), V. Seenu Reddy, MD, MBA (2019), M. Kevin Smith, MD, PhD, MMH (2018), Michel A. McDonald, MD (2012), Ralph C. Atkinson, III, MD (2017), Reuben A. Bueno, MD (1993), Charles W. Eckstein, MD (2003), Rebecca Leslie, MBA (CEO)

  • Apr 28, 2021

    Dr. Robin Williams - 2020 NAM President

    On January 30, 2020, Dr. Robin Williams was officially installed as president of the Nashville Academy of Medicine. Dr. Williams became the first African American to be elected to the role as president. Read Dr. Williams' press release here.


    Robin Williams, MD

  • Apr 23, 2021

    2020

    In March 2020, the Nashville Academy of Medicine and Medical Foundation of Nashville moved their offices to 28 White Bridge Road, Suite 400. The offices occupy the "penthouse" utilizing the full fourth floor of the building, which used to be a private residence complete with a private outdoor deck overlooking the downtown Nashville skyline.  

    Nashville Academy of Medicine, 2020-present

  • Apr 28, 2021

    2020

    2020 brought unprecedented challenges as physicians battled the COVID-19 pandemic around the world. The first case in Tennessee occurred on March 5, 2020 in Middle Tennessee. All NAM meetings were moved to virtual beginning in March, 2020 and continued through May, 2021. A COVID-19 resource center was developed to quickly bring the most up to date guidance to our members with daily updates from the CDC, TN Department of Health, and the Metro Nashville Public Health Department. Webinars were held frequently for NAM members and all area physicians with experts to understand the waves of the pandemic and important guidelines to follow with each wave.

    Hundreds of our members volunteered their time and expertise to fight the pandemic in many different ways. One example included a vaccination event at Nissan Stadium sponsored by the Metro Nashville Public Health Department. Member volunteers included our 2020 NAM President, Dr. Robin Williams, and our 2021 NAM President, Dr. Nicole Schlechter, pictured below.  

    While the community was looking to physicians for leadership and answers, NAM was providing guidance and bringing physicians in Nashville together - across hospital lines, across county lines, and across all specialties - during this critical time.

    Examples of COVID webinars hosted in 2020






    Nicole Schlechter, MD, PhD, and Robin Williams, MD

  • Apr 28, 2021

    Dr. Nicole Schlechter - 2021 NAM President


    Nicole Schlechter, MD, PhD

  • Apr 2, 2021

    2021

    In January of 2021, the Nashville Academy of Medicine unveiled a new logo celebrating 200 years of organized medicine in Nashville.

    2021 Nashville Academy of Medicine logo

  • Mar 5, 2021

    March, 2021

    On March 5, 2021, the Nashville Academy of Medicine officially kicked off 200th anniversary celebrations. Cookies with the new bicentennial NAM logo were personally delivered to physician board leaders and the medical groups who support us with membership for all their physicians. 

    NAM 200th anniversary cookies displayed with historical items

  • Apr 23, 2021

    March 5, 2021

    March 5, 2021, marked the official 200th Anniversary of our founding on March 5, 1821. NAM is honored to have been the first medical association in Tennessee. We now represent more than 2,300 members.

    On March 5, 2021, NAM leaders gathered at the steps of the Tennessee State Capitol to accept a Senate Joint Resolution honoring 200 years of our members serving Tennessee. Thank you to Senator Jeff Yarbro, Senator Heidi Campbell, Senator Brenda Gilmore, Senator Rusty Crowe, and Representative John Ray Clemmons for sponsoring SJR0182 to honor and commend the Nashville Academy of Medicine upon the occasion of our bicentennial anniversary. This ceremony was attended by a small group of NAM leaders amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, but all members will have the opportunity to celebrate later in 2021 during our bicentennial gala on October 2, 2021.


    L-R, Taylor Crawford (NAM), Kelly Smith (NAM), Ron Overfield, MD (NAM President 1982), M. Kevin Smith, MD, PhD, MMH (NAM President 2018), Nicole Schlechter, MD, PhD (NAM President 2021), Senator Jeff Yarbro, George "Trey" Lee, MD, MS, MBA (NAM President 2009), Rebecca Leslie (NAM CEO)


    Senate Join Resolution honoring NAM's 200th anniversary


    Nicole Schlechter, MD, PhD, accepting SJR0182 from Senator Jeff Yarbro

  • Apr 23, 2021

    May 22, 2021

    The Tennessee Medical Association House of Delegates met on May 22, 2021, to hear committee reports, present and vote on new resolutions and bylaws, install the 2021 President, and hold elections for Speaker and Vice Speaker. Delegates from NAM were the largest delegation of representative members from a component medical society.

    The final resolution of the day was presented by TMA Board of Trustees Chair Dr. Timothy Wilson, honoring and commending the Nashville Academy of Medicine for 200 years of service and congratulating our past and current members on the association's bicentennial anniversary. View the proclamation here.


    TMA Board of Trustees Chair Dr. Timothy Wilson recognizes NAM's 200th anniversary


    NAM delegation plus physician leaders from TMA including Elise Denney, MD (TMA President 2019-2020), M. Kevin Smith, MD (TMA President 2020-2021),Timothy Wilson, MD (TMA Board Chair), Edward Capparelli, MD (TMA Speaker of the House), and John McCarley, MD (TMA Board Treasurer)  

  • Apr 23, 2021

    October 2, 2021

    On October 2, 2021, a gala will be held in honor of the bicentennial anniversary of the Nashville Academy of Medicine benefiting the Medical Foundation of Nashville. Guests will be transported back in time with our 1821 Opening Cocktail Reception, sponsored by KraftCPAs, while browsing through historical memorabilia and archives of physicians and medicine in Nashville. Distinguished guests will then step into the modern, 2021 inspired gala, celebrating the 200th Anniversary of the Nashville Academy of Medicine. Learn more at www.nashvillemedicine.org/gala.

  • May 6, 2021

    Timeline Dedication

    The Nashville Academy of Medicine’s 200th Anniversary virtual timeline is dedicated to Ron Overfield, MD, 1982 NAM President. He remains active and engaged with our society, 40 years later. Dr. Overfield spent countless hours with NAM staff through emails, phone calls, and visits sharing his memory, insight, and archives of NAM information. His collections, covering decades of NAM history, were very instrumental in providing details for this timeline and other historical moments throughout 2021. He was the first member to join the Felix Robertson President’s Society, and was also involved in the naming of that honorary society including former presidents of NAM and TMA.

    Ron Overfield, MD

    We also give special thanks to Sarah Arntz, Archives Assistant with the Nashville Public Library. She was a valuable resource in helping us to utilize the library's resources and collections.  We are grateful for her partnership in making this project a reality. 

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